Nursing Officer Pauline Nalutaaya collects and sends the weekís public health data to the district headquarters at Butenga Health Centre IV, in Bukomansimbi District, via mTrac. Health workers are sending weekly health reports using the service, minimizing costs previously related to paper-based reporting.

In September 2013, an innovative government-led initiative known as mTrac is helping to improve the quality of health care and better save children's lives in Uganda. Launched by the Ministry of Health with support from UNICEF and other partners, mTrac uses basic mobile phones and Rapid SMS text messaging to monitor and track disease prevalence, drug stocks, health-service delivery and other health-related issues in real time, including in many of the countryís most remote areas. Currently, more than 10 million mobile phone users have the ability to engage with the Government in monitoring health services using the service. Digital innovations, including Ugandaís mTrac, are helping countries to reduce child mortality and support the global movement ëA Promise Renewedí. As of 12 September, 176 governments have signed the ëCommitting to Child Survival: A Promise Renewedí pledge, and thousands of civil society groups and private individuals have mobilized actions and resources in support of the goal of ending preventable child deaths within a generation. Uganda is among 15 low-income countries that have achieved reductions in under-five mortality of more than 100 deaths per 1,000 live births since 1990.

UNICEF looks to scale real time monitoring systems using open source technology to 110 countries by 2021.

By Raquel Wexler and Ye Wang UNICEF aims to scale up national real-time monitoring systems in 110 countries by 2021, starting with an initiative to support 11 countries in the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia and East and South Africa regions through the scale up of RapidPro. US$3 million […]

© UNICEF/FrankDejongh

U-Report Cote d’Ivoire Ignites a Youth Movement: 5 lessons on creating content to equitably engage girls and boys

AUTHORS: Sophie Chavanel, UNICEF Côte d’Ivoire Chief of Communications Norman Muhwezi, UNICEF Côte d’Ivoire Innovation Lead In Cote d’Ivoire, more than 50% of our population are under the age of 25. These 14 million young activists and changemakers within their community represent the generation that will lead progress towards a […]

"Community awareness at Vaemali Health Center, Epi Island, Vanuatu"
July 27, 2017: Dr. Ridwan Gustiana from UNICEF (cold supply chain planning expert) talking to health workers and the community about vaccine delivery tests (photo: Christian Vazquez)

Drones For Good – Participants in Vanuatu Drone Trial Take Vaccines to the Skies

In a first for the Pacific region, a trial is underway to test the capacity, efficiency and effectiveness of drones to deliver lifesaving vaccines to remote communities in Vanuatu.  The humanitarian application of ‘drones-for-good’ is a compelling use-case, and the trial aims to assess technologies and operators that can help […]

Why Big Data is Important to Youth: An Interview with Mohammad Ilham Akbar Junior

Why Big Data is Important to Youth: An Interview with Mohammad Ilham Akbar Junior

World Telecommunication and Information Society Day was celebrated on 17 May 2017. The theme for this year’s day was “Big Data for Big Impact” and focused on the power of Big Data for development. To commemorate the day, Mohammad Ilham Akbar Junior, a United Nations (UN) Youth Volunteer with the […]

Using Innovative sensor technology to evaluate ‘Handwashing with Ananse’ Games

Using Innovative sensor technology to evaluate ‘Handwashing with Ananse’ Games

By Sylvester Baffoe, M&E Officer, UNICEF Ghana Pneumonia and diarrhoeal diseases are one of the major causes of death for children under five in Ghana. In 2015 alone, over 10,000 children under five in Ghana died from pneumonia and diarrhoeal diseases. Handwashing with soap and water (HWWS) is a proven intervention […]